When it comes to wearing a watch most people wonder if they should wear their watch on their left or right wrist. I feel that the majority of people you ask will say that you should wear your watch on the left as it provides more ease of control. However, this could be based on the fact that the majority of the world is right-handed.

There are no real rules to which wrist you should wear your watch on. This post will emphasize the need for you to wear your watch in a way that you are comfortable with and what suits your needs.

Why Most People Wear their Watch on the Left Wrist

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the pocket watch was the most portable time telling device available. Watches also appeared on wrists, but that was typically as a fashion statement reserved for high status women as it was considered more of a piece of jewelry than a functional time telling tool.

However, during the first World War this changed. Time keeping was crucial on a battlefield, but the pocket watch wasn’t easy to carry around and check. Soldiers would either have to go into their pockets and grab the watch or find a way to affix to their fatigues.

In 1880, the first wrist watch for military use was created by Swiss watchmakers Girard-Perregaux. The design was similar to what we see in today’s watches with the most noticeable exception being the metal grill which was used to protect the glass face. With the soldiers often having their right hands occupied with weaponry, watches were placed on the left wrist by default and this became the norm.

Wearing a watch on the left wrist had become the conventional way of doing things. Watch movement also added a reason to wear watches on the left wrist. On quartz and mechanical movement watches, the crown is almost always on the right side. This would make setting the time and winding the watch easier as a person could use their right-hand to use the crown functions.

There are also practical reasons why as well. When we think about the world population, there are far more people who are right-hand dominant as opposed to those who are left-hand dominant. Wearing the watch on the left wrist meant keeping the timepiece out of the way and making it easier to take a look at while doing things such as writing or eating. Also, wearing it on the less dominant hand makes it less susceptible to damaging or breaking.

Bottom Line

I think in today’s world if you ask most watch lovers which wrist should you wear your watch on, most people will say it doesn’t really matter. You may have some traditionalists who feel that a watch should be worn on the left wrist regardless, but I don’t necessarily agree with that. As a lefty, I like to wear my watch on my right wrist as it feels more natural to me. Having the watch on my right wrist allows me to write easier or keep the watch safe from actions with my dominant hand.

However, you don’t always have to wear your watch on your non-dominant hand. You could be right-hand dominant and wear you watch on your right-hand if you like! I think that you should wear your watch based on your own personal style and preference. As long as it isn’t a weird or eccentric way of wearing it, most people will likely not nitpick which wrist it’s on.

Whichever wrist you decide to wear it on, just make sure that it fits your personal style and that you wear it with some pride and confidence. If it’s a stylish timepiece and you have a swagger about you while wearing it, people won’t really care what wrist it’s on.

Have any opinions on which wrist a watch should be worn on? If so, get in the comment box below and share your thoughts.

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2 Comments

John · April 30, 2019 at 12:21 pm

I have always worn my watch on my left arm. My son just started wearing a watch and he put it on his right arm, he said that it felt better and he found that he liked it better. He is right handed, I wonder how many people wear a watch on their dominate arm, or if he will change arms when he finds that the watch gets in the way of some activities.
John

    Jerry Strickland · April 30, 2019 at 10:55 pm

    Interesting that he wears it on his dominant hand. Me being left handed makes it somewhat uncomfortable to wear my watches on that wrist. I find that it alters some actions such as writing for me.

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